Saturday, August 8, 2015

19th Century Artist Predicted Whale-Shaped Flying Cars by 2000 (10 pics)

1882
Leaving the Opera in the Year 2000

In 1882 French illustrator Albert Robida (1848–1926) completed a wildly futuristic engraving: his vision of fashionable Parisian opera attendees, in the year 2000. 

In tandem, Robida wrote a science fiction trilogy in the late nineteenth century, which drew comparison to author Jules Verne's renown works, such as Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.  In Robida's novels he predicted many phenomena of the forthcoming modern world: mass tourism, pollution, guided missiles, chemical weapons and the emancipation of women.
Most striking was the Téléphonoscope, a flat screen television display delivering 24-hour news, programs, education and face-to-face communication.

Below we examine the details of "Leaving the Opera in the Year 2000."
1862/2000
Many of the men in the picture wear high, peaked military-esque hats. Pink and yellow are very "in" in the year 2000.
1862/2000
A building surrounded by airborne ships docking and departing.
1882/2000
The Eiffel Tower* has a large docking platform at its top. The yellow taxi, like other ships, resembles a fish. The pilot sits outside.
1882/2000
The ships still sport klaxons.
1882/2000
In the pink ship, the woman pilots. Beneath, a man pursues a woman who pilots her own ship.
1882/2000
There are several police officers in the picture. They ride smaller, sleeker ships and also carry swords.
1882/2000
An airborne group passes over a gondola-like ship and some police craft.
1882/2000
A large bus with a whale-like grill carries an advert, and an anchor. In the year 2000, the top deck remains open.
1882/2000
Restaurant patrons await transport, including yellow taxi ships. A man holds a hook to dock the craft.
1882/2000
A woman pilot with a revealing gown steers her own ornate craft. On the stairs to the top-right, we spot some elaborate hosiery.
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